Dainfern College Prep: Code of Conduct

To download the Code of Conduct for Dainfern College Prep, please click here.

Dainfern College Preparatory School Promotion and Retention Policy

1. Promotion and Retention guidelines

The promotion or retention of a pupil rests ultimately at the discretion of the Principal of the phase concerned. The discretion of the Principal is exercised through negotiation with the various Support professionals (if relevant), the Deputy Principal: Academics, Deputy Principal: Student Affairs (the Promotion/Retention Committee) and the parents of the pupil concerned.

Guidelines regarding the promotion and retention of pupils at Dainfern College Preparatory have been considered with reference to the Department of Basic Education’s National Policy pertaining to the Programme and Promotion Requirements of the National Curriculum Statement.

For the purposes of retention and promotion at Dainfern College Preparatory the following applies:

2. Junior Preparatory: Foundation Phase (Grades 0-3)

Mastery of core skills and knowledge in the Foundation Phase facilitates optimal outcomes and achievement in the Intermediate Phase. These core skills and knowledge form the foundation of the next phase of education. Children’s cognitive development is intrinsically linked to their physical and emotional development and wellbeing.

In the Junior Preparatory phase, children’s progress is carefully monitored and assessed continuously. Assessments by educational psychologists, speech and language therapists and occupational therapists are often necessary to ascertain where developmental delays, barriers to learning and difficulties in specific areas lie. These assessments are also used to put strategies and processes in place to ensure optimal progress.

Promotion in the Foundation Phase is guided by the following criteria:

  • Adequate achievement (Level 4) in one official language at Home Language level.
  • Adequate achievement (Level 4) in Mathematics.
  • Adequate achievement (Level 4) in one of the official languages at First Additional Language Level.

Communication and dialogue between parents, the class teacher, the Junior Prep Principal and the Learner Support Team ensure that each individual child’s progress is monitored and assessed on an ongoing basis.

2.1 Retention

It may be in the best interests of a pupil’s further progress to consider retention where a pupil’s learning has been compromised by a variety of factors such as immaturity, developmental delays, perceptual difficulties and language barriers. Children may be retained if it is evident that retention will significantly increase the child’s potential to master the skills and knowledge necessary to proceed on the academic journey.

A pupil may only be retained once in the Junior Preparatory Phase in order to prevent the pupil from being in this phase for longer than five years. A pupil in the Junior Preparatory Phase (Grades 0-3) who is not ready to perform at the expected level and who has already been retained in the Foundation Phase (Grades 0-3) and who is likely to be retained again in the Intermediate Phase (Grades 4-6), should receive a condoned promotion, with the necessary support in place, in order to progress to the next grade.

2.2 Condoned promotion

If, through negotiation with the Promotion/Retention Committee, it is agreed that a pupil may be promoted to the next grade or Phase with specific academic support recommendations being put in place, the pupil in question will then receive a ‘condoned promotion’ in the end-of-year academic report as follows:

“[pupil’s name] has received a condoned promotion to Grade […]

It is important to note that where a pupil at Dainfern College Preparatory has been granted a condoned promotion, it remains the responsibility of the parent and the child, in consultation with the relevant teachers and specialists concerned, to ensure that the recommendations and interventions are put in place. If the recommendations and/or interventions are not put in place to the satisfaction of the Promotion/Retention Committee, the College reserves the right to terminate the contract with the child at the school.

2.3 Consolidation

Should it be seen to be in the best interests of the pupil concerned, the Promotion/Retention Committee also reserves the right to recommend to the parents of a pupil in question that the academic year be consolidated by retaining the pupil. This recommendation may be made even if the pupil meets the minimum requirements for the particular stage. Consolidation for a pupil will include various interventions and recommendations made to assist with the pupil’s progress. The pupil in question will receive a ‘consolidation’ in the end-of-year academic report as follows:

“[pupil’s name] will be consolidating Grade […] in […following academic year…]

3. Senior Preparatory: Intermediate and Senior Phases (Grades 4-7)

For the Intermediate and Senior Phases, the following is used as a guideline for promotion and/or retention:

In order for promotion to take place in the Senior Preparatory phase a pupil must meet the following basic expectations:

  • Level 4: Adequate Achievement (≥50%) in one official language at Home Language level.
  • Level 4: Adequate Achievement (≥50%) in at least two additional Core Subjects1, excluding English First Language as stated above.2

1 Core Subjects for the purposes of Dainfern College Preparatory School comprise English Home Language (First Language), Afrikaans / isiZulu (First Additional Language), Mathematics, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences.

2 Immigrant pupils may be exempted from achieving a Level 4: Adequate Achievement (≥50%) in their first two years of studying a First Additional Language.

3.1 Retention

A pupil is automatically considered for retention by the Promotion/Retention Committee should they fail to meet the basic expectations as outlined in points (a) and (b) above.

A pupil may only be retained once in the Intermediate Phase in order to prevent the pupil from being in this phase for longer than four years. A pupil in the Intermediate Phase (Grades 4-6) who may not be ready to perform at the expected level for the following academic year, who has already been retained in the Foundation Phase (Grades 0-3) and who is likely to be retained again in the Senior Phase (Grades 7-12), should receive a condoned promotion, with the necessary support in place, in order to progress to the next grade.

For the purposes of individual subjects at Dainfern College Preparatory, a pupil who does not achieve a semester result of 50% or above will be considered to be a pupil who has not met the requirements of that specific subject.

3.2 Condoned Promotion

If, through negotiation with the Promotion/Retention Committee, it is agreed that a pupil be promoted to the next grade or Phase with academic support recommendations being agreed upon, then the pupil in question will receive a ‘condoned promotion’ in the end-of-year academic report as follows:

“[pupil’s name] has received a condoned promotion to Grade […]

It must be noted, most importantly, that should a pupil at Dainfern College Preparatory be granted a condoned promotion, it remains the responsibility of the parent and the child, in consultation with the relevant teachers and specialists concerned, that the recommendations and interventions that are put in place are met. If the recommendations and/or interventions are not followed to the satisfaction of the Promotion/Retention Committee, the College reserves the right to terminate the contract with the child at the school.

A pupil who receives a mark below 50% for any Core Subject will be considered for either consolidation and/or condoned promotion.

3.3 Consolidation

Should it be seen to be in the best interests of the pupil concerned (based on factors such as academic progress, age, emotional and social development, cognitive development), the Promotion/Retention Committee also reserves the right to recommend to the parents of the pupil in question that they consolidate the academic year by being retained. This recommendation may be made even if the pupil meets the minimum requirements as stated in this Policy. Consolidation of a pupil will include various interventions and recommendations made to assist with the pupil’s progress.

A pupil will automatically be considered for consolidation if the pupil receives a result of below 50% for any Core Subject. Should it be agreed upon by the Committee, the pupil in question will receive a ‘consolidation’ in the end-of-year academic report as follows:

“[pupil’s name] will be consolidating Grade […] in […following academic year…]

4. Decisions and recommendations

Decisions regarding consolidations and promotions will be made and communicated from the month of October towards the Half-Term break, in the third term of the year in question.

Dainfern College Learner Support Accommodations Policy

To download the Dainfern College Learner Support Accommodations Policy, please click here.

Dainfern College Music Policy

Policy for Music

Introduction

This document is a statement of the aims, philosophy, principles and strategies for the teaching and learning of music. Music at Dainfern College embraces an internal as well as an external section of the College. Internal music refers to general class music teaching, Grade 0 to Grade 9 in particular, which falls under the umbrella of Arts & Culture and is based on The Revised National Curriculum Statement. This curriculum is aligned with the assessment policy as contained in the Assessment Policy (Government Gazette No 19640 of 1998). The fundamental knowledge, skills and understanding for the subject are categorised into four main integrated sections known as Learning Outcomes. All the Learning Outcomes are strongly linked and do not operate in isolation. This music policy concerns itself initially with the internal general class music teaching.

The emphasis in music education at Dainfern College is on participation. This may be in the form of making music vocally, playing recorder (grades 3 and 4), playing melodic percussion instruments such as Orff instruments and marimbas or playing non-melodic percussion instruments including djembe drums. Learners also participate in this process by listening to music. They can be involved in the latter by listening passively or moving to recorded music. 

Music is also used to create an awareness and appreciation for the music dimension of cultures other than those of learners at Dainfern College.

Aims

The aims in teaching music are that all learners will:

  • Develop a belief in and confidence in their own musicality;
  • Develop skills in performing, composing, appraising and listening to music;
  • Understand music as a form of expression through exposure to the work of composers and performers from a range of cultures and traditions;
  • Find enjoyment and value in active engagement in musical activities;
  • Develop aesthetic sensitivity to music;
  • Understand how music can be integrated with other subjects and areas of learning; and
  • Be able to work competently in independent and collaborative situations.


Philosophy

Music is a powerful, unique form of communication that can change the way children feel, think and act. As an integral part of culture, past and present, it can help children to understand themselves and relate to others. The teaching of music develops children’s ability to listen and appreciate a wide variety of music and to make judgements about musical quality. It encourages active involvement in different forms of music making, helping children to acquire a sense of group identity and togetherness. Music increases self-discipline and creativity, aesthetic sensitivity and fulfilment.

Principles of the Teaching and Learning of Music

Music is a form of artistic expression which is found and valued in many forms and styles throughout history and throughout all cultures.  As well as having intrinsic value as a subject in its own right, music is a discipline which develops creativity and imaginative and analytical thinking.  It brings together intellect and feeling, enabling personal expression, reflection and emotional development. It develops the ability to work both independently and as a member of a group. 

Through the integrated activities of performing, composing and appraising, children develop an understanding of how music works.  By exploring music they learn about the elements of pitch, duration, timbre, texture, dynamics and structure, and how they can be combined.  Although it is taught in school as a distinct subject, cross-curricular links are frequently made with many other subjects.

The teaching and learning of music encourages children to explore and develop their own musicality and to appreciate and value a wide variety of music and musical activities.

Music in the National Curriculum

General class music teaching is a subject which falls under the umbrella of Arts and Culture in the National Curriculum.

The fundamental knowledge, skills and understanding for the subject are categorised into four main integrated sections known as Learning Outcomes.  These are:

  1. Creating, interpreting and presenting;
  2. Reflecting;
  3. Participating and collaborating; and
  4. Expressing and communicating.


The knowledge, skills and understanding are taught through activities which ensure a breadth of study across each stage, as detailed in the National Curriculum Statement.

Wherever possible, links are made with other national curriculum subjects to ensure that learning is meaningful.

Strategies for the teaching of Music

Classroom music is taught to each class by a specialist music teacher who plans and delivers the curriculum.

Music is taught through whole class teaching, group work and individual work as appropriate.

Music is organised as part of an integrated approach to learning wherein music is integrated with class topics and other subjects where appropriate. It is sometimes necessary to teach stand-alone music topics to ensure progression within and coverage of the music curriculum.


Internal Music

LEARNING AREA: ARTS AND CULTURE

Based on The Revised National Curriculum Statement. This curriculum is aligned with the assessment policy as contained in the Assessment Policy (Government Gazette No 19640 of 1998).


Junior Preparatory

Foundation Phase Grades 0 - 3

Learning Outcome 1

CREATING, INTERPRETING AND PRESENTING

Grades 0 and 1

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to develop skills and knowledge through exploring and experiencing art based upon self and own environment.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Claps and stamps number rhythms and rhymes in tempo.
  2. Keeps a steady pulse while accompanying a song.
  3. Sings number and letter songs and rhymes.
  4. Sings tunes rhythmically and at varying tempi and loudness.


Grade 2

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to develop the skills and knowledge to create and present art activities based upon ideas drawn from immediate environment.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Demonstrates fundamental pulse and echoes rhythms from the immediate environment.
  2. Demonstrates fundamental pulse using body percussion, instrumental percussion and movement.
  3. Sings a song found in the immediate environment.


Grade 3

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to develop skills and knowledge to express ideas, feeling and moods through creating and presenting artworks.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Demonstrates the difference between running notes, walking notes, skipping notes.
  2. Demonstrates the difference between ascending and descending order of notes.
  3. Sings songs and makes music to express a variety of ideas, feelings and moods.


Learning Outcome 2

REFLECTING

Grade 0

  1. Imitates a variety of natural sounds in own environment.
  2. Distinguishes between a talking voice and a singing voice.

Grade 1

  1. Experiments with different sounds to accompany fables and stories as sound effects.
  2. Differentiates between high and low, long and short, loud and soft sounds.

Grade 2

  1. Identifies and sings songs from different situations and talks about them (e.g. working, skipping, game songs).
  2. Listens to and responds in movement to walking, running and hopping notes in songs from the immediate environment.

Grade 3

  1. Identifies and sings songs from different situations and talks about them (e.g. working, skipping, game songs).
  2. Listens to and responds in movement to walking, running and hopping notes in songs from the immediate environment.


Learning Outcome 3

PARTICIPATING AND COLLABORATING

Grade 0

  1. Brings songs from home and shares them with others.

Grade 1

  1. Participates in musical call and response games and activities.
  2. Plays rhythm, clapping, skipping and singing games in pairs.

Grade 2

  1. Echoes a rhythm by body percussion or by playing on a percussion instrument to accompany songs sung together.

Grade 3

  1. Sing songs, rounds and canons in a choir to express feelings and moods.
  2. Walks, runs, skips and sways to the pulse of the songs fellow learners are singing and the music they are listening to.


Learning Outcome 4

EXPRESSING AND COMMUNICATING

Grade 0

  1. Listens and moves creatively to music, stories, songs and sounds.

Grade 1

  1. Uses own imagination and fantasy stories to create sounds.

Grade 2

  1. Imitates natural and mechanical sounds to create sound effects.

Grade 3

  1. Imitates natural and mechanical sounds to create sound effects.


Senior Preparatory

Grade 4

Learning Outcome 1

CREATING, INTERPRETING AND PRESENTING

The learner will be able to create, interpret and present work in each of the art forms. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to develop skills and knowledge to create ideas and present arts activities using the body, voice, natural and found resources.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Uses voice, body and found or made instruments to explore sounds and silence related to walking, running, and skipping note values, in order to explore rhythms and to create sound pictures.
  2. Composes and presents a short rhythmic pattern that has crotchets, crotchet rests, minims and minim rests through body percussion.
  3. Makes in various tone colours, a simple wind instruments such as a Kazoo or Tshikona/Dinaka pipes, or percussion instruments such as shakers.
  4. Creates and presents melodies using voice and found and natural instruments to demonstrate difference in pitch and note values.


Composite

  1. Makes a puppet and uses it to create a puppet show with music and movement.


Learning Outcome 2

REFLECTING

The learner will be able to reflect critically and creatively on artistic and cultural processes, products and styles in past and present contexts. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to reflect on and respond to Arts & Culture activities using appropriate terms, vocabulary and other resources.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Recognises crotchet and minim note values and rests in a short melody.
  2. Recognises time signatures such as four-four and three-four.
  3. Listens to and identifies musical instruments in terms of appearance, name, how sound is produced, timbre and general pitch classification (high-low).


Learning Outcome 3

PARTICIPATING AND COLLABORATING

The learner will be able to demonstrate personal and interpersonal skills through individual and group participation in Arts & Culture activities. 

Assessment Standards:

  1. Sings and/or plays canons, rounds and two-part songs with other learners, using natural, manufactured and found instruments.
  2. Plays simple wind instruments such as a Kazoo or Tshikona/Dinaka pipes or percussion instruments such as shakers in harmony with others.


Learning Outcome 4

EXPRESSING AND COMMUNICATING

The learner will be able to analyse and use multiple forms of communication and expression in Arts & Culture. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to explore, express and communicate using the body, voice, natural, found and manufactured resources.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Uses voice, body, percussion, natural, found or made instruments to accompany stories, dances and songs.
  2. Uses sounds in a free rhythm to build up sound pictures to accompany stories or dances.


Grade 5

Learning Outcome 1

CREATING, INTERPRETING AND PRESENTING

The learner will be able to create, interpret and present work in each of the art forms. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to develop the skills and knowledge required to create and present artworks using multiple literacies (visual, spatial, aural, oral, kinaesthetic, dramatic, cultural.)

Assessment Standards:

  1. Demonstrates concentration and accurate listening through recognising, repeating and creating rhythms and polyrhythms, using movement, body percussion and natural instruments.
  2. Composes and presents a short rhythmic pattern that has crotchets, crotchet rests, minims, minim rests, quavers and quaver rests through body percussion.
  3. Improvises and creates music phrases that use repetition, accent, call and response.
  4. Sings songs in long (3/4) and normal (3/8) triplet.


Learning Outcome 2

REFLECTING

The learner will be able to reflect critically and creatively on artistic and cultural processes, products and styles in past and present contexts. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to reflect on and offer opinions on Arts & Culture processes, products and concepts.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Recognises the letter names of notes on lines and in spaces on a treble staff and their difference in pitch.
  2. Recognises crotchet, minim and quaver note values and rests in a short melody.
  3. Recognises and describes the different timbres of voices in choral music.
  4. Listens to a variety of selected songs and identifies the genre (e.g. Blues, Pop, Kwaito, Classical, Traditional, Free-Kiba, Opera, Musicals, Malombo, Kwassa-Kwassa, Techno, Soukous), and offers opinion on the style.


Learning Outcome 3

PARTICIPATING AND COLLABORATING

The learner will be able to demonstrate personal and interpersonal skills through individual and group participation in Arts & Culture activities. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to participate in devising Arts & Culture activities that develop various literacies.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Sings and/or plays an instrument in a group with appropriate rhythm, pitch and dynamics in any genre of music.
  2. Combines a number of melorhythm instruments (drums, marimba) to create textural blend.


Learning Outcome 4

EXPRESSING AND COMMUNICATING

The learner will be able to analyse and use multiple forms of communication and expression in Arts & Culture. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to use multiple resources to explore and communicate social, cultural and environmental issues through the Arts.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Identifies and sings songs from different societies, cultures and contexts, that seem to communicate the same idea.
  2. Uses own compositions of poetry and song to draw attention to current social and environmental issues.
  3. Communicates a musical intention using the interface of pitch-based harmony (mellophony) instruments.


Grade 6

Learning Outcome 1

CREATING, INTERPRETING AND PRESENTING

The learner will be able to create, interpret and present work in each of the art forms. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to develop skills and knowledge to create and present artworks based on South Africa’s past and present.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Focuses on music from a variety of South African forms:
  2. Improvises and creates music phrases with voice and/or instruments that explore dynamics, articulation, pitch and rhythmic patterns;
  3. Plays simple rhythmic patterns on a drum or equivalent;
  4. Explores and uses drum hand techniques such as base slap, open slap, muffle;
  5. Reads and sings or plays the scale and simple melodies in C Major.


Learning Outcome 2

REFLECTING

The learner will be able to reflect critically and creatively on artistic and cultural processes, products and styles in past and present contexts. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to think critically,reflect on and share understanding of the Arts in the historical,social and culural environment of South Africa.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Listens to and discusses the use of repetition as an organising principle in African music.
  2. Selects a repertoire of songs that are used in various cultural environments, describes what cultural events they are drawn from, explains what the message of the lyrical content is and what the songs are used for.


Learning Outcome 3

PARTICIPATING AND COLLABORATING

The learner will be able to demonstrate personal and interpersonal skills through individual and group participation in Arts &
 Culture activities. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to interact with others, showing adaptability to new ideas or situations, affirming and acknowledging diversity.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Sings and/or plays in a group - canons, rounds and two-part songs from at least three cultural traditions of South Africa.


Learning Outcome 4

EXPRESSING AND COMMUNICATING

The learner will be able to analyse and use multiple forms of communication and expression in Arts & Culture. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to explore, express and communicate the meaning and form of various historical, social and cultural rituals or practices in South Africa.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Dance and Music
  • Finds out about, tries out and explains a song-dance ritual (e.g. snake dance, rain dance, wedding dance, circle dance, reed dance, stick dance), referring to its purpose and structure - patterns, repetition and sequence.
  1. Music
  • Researches, creates and presents music that conveys and suggests the symbolism of ritual.
  • Demonstrates and describes the use of various artefacts in cultural rituals.
  • Researches murals in the community as a form of visual communication in relation to: i/ The intended message; ii/ Target group; iii/ Techniques; iv/ Appropriate materials; and v/ Symbols and signs.


Grade 7

Learning Outcome 1

CREATING, INTERPRETING AND PRESENTING

The learner will be able to create, interpret and present work in each of the art forms. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to develop the skills and knowledge to create and present artworks that explore human rights in South Africa.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Forms rhythmic sentences combining and mixing different drumming techniques and percussion patterns.
  2. Improvises and creates music phrases using concepts such as mood, form and contrast.
  3. Reads and sings or plays the scales and simple melodies in G Major.
  4. Composes music, songs or jingles about human rights issues or to accompany a performance or presentation about human rights.


Learning Outcome 2

REFLECTING

The learner will be able to reflect critically and creatively on artistic and cultural processes, products and styles in past and present contexts. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to reflect on local examples of natural and cultural heritage.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Classifies African instruments in terms of ideophones, chordophones, membranophones, aerophones, and Western instruments according to strings, woodwinds, brass and percussion.
  2. Discusses any of the following types of instrument in terms of the shape, materials used, type of sound, how it is played, what makes the sound:

i/ Drums - made of wood, gourds or clay - to show the different membranes that are made of cow, goat or donkey hides;
ii/ Percussion instruments - rattles, bells, clap stick, slit gongs, mbira, xylophones, kalimba, likembe, lamallaphone;
iii/ Stringed instruments - musical bows, lutes, lyres, harps, zithers, kora, xalam;
iv/ Wind instruments - flutes made from bamboo, reeds, wood, clay and bones;
v/ Trumpets made of animal horns and wood;
vi/ Clarinets from the Savannah region made of guinea-corn or sorghum stems; 
vii/ Flugelhorn, saxophones and guitars.


Learning Outcome 3

PARTICIPATING AND COLLABORATING

The learner will be able to demonstrate personal and interpersonal skills through individual and group participation in Arts & Culture activities. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to engage collaboratively in Arts & Culture activities to develop good social relations and explore ways of promoting nation-building.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Sings and/or plays South African songs from various cultures with appropriate rhythm, tempo and dynamics.
  2. Creates suitable melodic or non-melodic accompaniment for any South African folk song, anthem or melody.


Learning Outcome 4

EXPRESSING AND COMMUNICATING

The learner will be able to analyse and use multiple forms of communication and expression in Arts & Culture. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to explore, express and communicate the role of heritage in South African Arts, past and present.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Investigates and explains the purpose, function and role of different instruments used in indigenous, traditional or Western forms of music in South Africa.


Grade 8

Learning Outcome 1

CREATING, INTERPRETING AND PRESENTING

The learner will be able to create, interpret and present work in each of the art forms. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to develop the skills and knowledge to create and present artworks based on popular culture in South Africa.

Assessment Standards:

1. Generic/Additional: Learners participate in all the generic assessment standards of this outcome. Learners intending to select an art subject in the Further Education and Training Band should also participate in additional assessment standards of at least one art form of choice.
2. Music: Generic:
i/ Learns and performs songs or music from popular or local culture.
3. Music: Additional:
i/ Composes and performs a 4-bar melody using crotchets, quavers and minims.
ii/ Reads, writes and sings or plays scales and simple melodies in the keys of C Major, G Major and F Major.
iii/ Creates an integral musical presentation interpreting a message, incorporating dance, drama and visual elements.

Learning Outcome 2

REFLECTING

The learner will be able to reflect critically and creatively on artistic and cultural processes, products and styles in past and present contexts. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to think critically and reflect on Arts & Culture processes and products in relation to human rights issues in Africa.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Listens to and demonstrates how the use of polyphony in African music accords participants equitable space in the making of music.


Learning Outcome 3

PARTICIPATING AND COLLABORATING

The learner will be able to demonstrate personal and interpersonal skills through individual and group participation in Arts & Culture activities. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to share information about careers in arts industries and engage collaboratively in arts enterprises.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Researches and shares information about music and music-related careers and training.


Learning Outcome 4

EXPRESSING AND COMMUNICATING

The learner will be able to analyse and use multiple forms of communication and expression in Arts & Culture. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to explore, express and communicate issues of stereotyping, discrimination and prejudice in contemporary culture.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Identifies and explains gender and/or cultural stereotyping in lyrics and in the use of instruments over time and in the present.


Grade 9

Learning Outcome 1

CREATING, INTERPRETING AND PRESENTING

The learner will be able to create, interpret and present work in each of the art forms. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to develop the skills and knowledge required to create, market and present artworks.

Assessment Standards:

1. Generic/Additional: Learners participate in all the generic assessment standards of this outcome. Learners intending to select an art subject in the Further Education and Training Band should also participate in additional assessment standards of at least one art form of choice.
2. Music: Generic:
i/ Makes music using voice and available percussion or melodic instruments for performance in 5/4, 7/4, 12/8 and 4/4 meters.
ii/ Organises and markets a musical performance with regard to planning, advertising, fundraising and producing.
3. Music: Additional:
i/ Reads, writes and sings or plays scales and melodies in D Flat, A Flat, B Flat and E Flat Major.
ii/ Blends the styles of own choice from immediate cultural environment and those used in West, East, Central or North Africa (e.g. Kwaito, Jazz, Kwassa-Kwassa, Gospel, Hip-hop, High Life, Soukous).
iii/ Uses ululation, vocalic lilting, crepitation and mouth drumming to create a climax in a musical situation.

Learning Outcome 2

REFLECTING

The learner will be able to reflect critically and creatively on artistic and cultural processes, products and styles in past and present contexts. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to offer a critical interpretation of the relationship between global and local cultures.

Assessment Standards:

  1. Analyses how music is used in songs, rituals, public events, movies, opera or advertisements to evoke response.


Learning Outcome 3

PARTICIPATING AND COLLABORATING

The learner will be able to demonstrate personal and interpersonal skills through individual and group participation in Arts & Culture activities. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to use group activities to explore and share experiences of power relations.

Assessment Standards:

We know this when the learner:

  1. Takes on the roles of conductor, singer, musician, manager or accompanist in ensemble music activities.

Learning Outcome 4

EXPRESSING AND COMMUNICATING

The learner will be able to analyse and use multiple forms of communication and expression in Arts & Culture. 

Organising Principle:

The learner will be able to explore, express and communicate an understanding of the impact of mass media and technologies on Culture and the Arts.

Assessment Standards:

Explains how technology has influenced music over time.

Whilst music forms part of the regular school curriculum, another branch exists in the form of the extracurricular music centre. In addition to classroom music across the school, exciting extracurricular activities, a varied range of peripatetic instrumental tuition and, of course, extremely enthusiastic singing in the school assemblies, help to create a special place for music within the whole school curriculum.


External Music

Extracurricular Music Centre

Extracurricular music plays a large and vital role in the life of Dainfern College. All the activities provide valuable opportunities to link with the local community, parents and also to liaise with other schools.

Specialist instrumental teachers

Individual music tuition is offered in violin, cello, rock and classical guitar, flute, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, piano, keyboard and voice. Requests for tuition in other musical instruments will also be accommodated. Individual and group theory classes are available. The music tuition encompasses a variety of styles such as classical, jazz, rock and pop styles. Instrumental tuition is available to both the Preparatory and High schools as well as to the wider community including adults.

The peripatetic music staff are required to perform a limited number of administrative tasks relevant to their pupils, such as compiling timetables and accounts as well as writing reports. In addition to this, the music staff assist with musical functions including their pupils’ performances at assemblies and soirees.

Music staff meetings are scheduled for approximately two hours at the start of each term and as the need arises.

Ensembles

Music encourages cooperation and collaboration with others, as children play in groups, large and small. Children develop an understanding of music from different cultures, backgrounds and age groups, recognising the contribution these make and the pleasure they give. Music helps children to develop confidence and responsibility and to make the most of their abilities, for example by taking a lead in performing activities. In doing this, learners acquire the knowledge, skills and understanding needed to make music. Pupils develop skills, attitudes and attributes that can support learning in other subject areas and which are needed for life and work, for example listening skills, the ability to concentrate, creativity, aesthetic sensitivity, perseverance, self-confidence and perception.

Dainfern College offers several ensemble opportunities such as:

  • Junior Preparatory Choir
  • Senior Preparatory Choir
  • Senior Preparatory A Cappella group
  • High School A Cappella group
  • String and Guitar ensembles
  • Marimba bands
  • Djembe groups
  • Rock band
  • Flute ensemble
  • Smaller ensembles

Concerts 

The musicians have several performance opportunities to expose their music before a live audience. The performance may be by a single musician or by a musical ensemble, such as an orchestra, choir, or musical band. Concerts are held in a wide variety of settings. Dainfern College offers several performing opportunities such as:

  • Soirées
  • Matinées
  • Assemblies
  • Tours
  • Musicals
  • Combined schools performances
  • Shopping Centre performances
  • Linder Auditorium ‘Magic of Music’
  • Founders’ Day
  • Grade 7 Showcase
  • High School Cultural Showcase
  • Ensemble Showcase
  • Dainfern College Music Festival
  • Carols by Candlelight


Assessment

External Assessment

Examinations

Musicians are encouraged to enter for the international and local examining bodies for both practical and theory examinations.

International:

  • Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music
  • Trinity Guildhall of London
  • Trinity Rock School

Local:

  • UNISA
  • ALMSA

Eisteddfodau

Musicians may also participate in the local eisteddfodau:

  • National Eisteddfod Academy
  • Randburg Eisteddfod
  • Pretoria Eisteddfod
  • Johannesburg Festival for the Advancement of Music


Internal Assessment

Awards and recognition

Students are recognised for their achievements in the Creative Arts learning areas, in cultural extramurals and ensembles, and in individual music. Please see the relevant Colours policies for the Preparatory School and High School for further details.

Please contact Zelda Martin, Director of Music at Dainfern College, for further information.

Dainfern College Preparatory School IT Department Acceptable Use Policy

“All IT equipment and services provided are designed and installed for educational purposes only”

10 IT Golden Rules

1. All data and personal files are the property of Dainfern College and will be monitored.

2. All students are expected to use the computers in a safe and responsible way, and to treat all IT equipment with respect.

3. No food or drink is allowed in the IT labs.

4. No student may use computers without a staff member being present.

5. Students may only store school-related material on computers. Copying of music, videos, applications and games is prohibited.

6. Students may not use IT equipment to communicate with each other during class time via email, chat messaging and social networking sites like Facebook, twitter and Google Chat unless stipulated differently by the teacher.

7. Students may not play games on computers or over the Internet, unl;ess stipulated differently by the teacher.

8. No student may use another student’s account. There may be no sharing of passwords. A password needs to be changed if there is any breach.

9. Students may not modify computer files, folders or settings without authorisation from an IT staff member.

10. Students may only use the printers for school-related tasks with permission from the relevant staff member.


The school's Code of Conduct will be enforced should any of the above be breached.

I have read and understood the Dainfern College IT Department AUP (Rules) and agree to fully obey it.

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Guardian:

Dainfern College

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Dainfern College, 96 Broadacres Drive, Dainfern

PO Box 3199, Dainfern, 2055

Tel: +27 (0)11 469 0635; Email: info@dainferncollege.co.za